How Trevor Linden Sold Out

This was originally written and posted in December 2010. As with all of the older posts, I've decided to leave this one in its (somewhat naive, but well-intentioned) original condition. The follow up to this was called "How Trevor Linden Sold Out: The Prequel". (Yes, I like movies)


Before I begin, I would like to say that as most kids growing up in Vancouver through the 1990's, I considered Trevor Linden to be an idol. A great hockey player and role model. As an adult, and more specifically as an eye care professional, my opinions have evolved.

As usual, I'll try to present my information as fact and do my best to remain impartial. But, I can't make any promises ;)

Many of you have probably seen our good friend Trevor on TV, or on the many obnoxious billboards around Vancouver, advertising for clearly contacts. Smiling with his spectacles on while promoting glasses and contact lenses for cheaper prices. "Glass, plastic, and two tiny little screws..." says Mr. Linden. Is that so?

Allow me to present the following points in a bulleted format.

  • First, I would like to challenge the notion that glasses are simply glass, plastic, and screws. For those people for whom glasses are a daily necessity, their presence cannot be so cheaply simplified and their importance so easily ignored. Glasses change people's lives. When Johnny Nash sang "I can see clearly now, the rain is gone...", what he was really saying was "I can see clearly now, I have my glasses on". True story. Glasses are a patient's windows into the world. They are a reflection of a person's personality and style. Try to fit that into $38, Trevor.
  • Second, my boy Trev had laser surgery a few years back so he's probably forgotten about the importance of specs. We'll see where he shops once he starts needing reading glasses.
  • Third, quality and service (or lack there of) cannot be overlooked. What happens when the arm falls off your glasses? Or you need to have the frames adjusted? Will you take them to the Linden residence?

Buying Contact Lenses Online:

A contact lens can be considered a medical device. A lens is essentially a prosthesis. A piece of precisely designed silicone and plastic placed on the surface of the eye for a medical purpose.

If poorly fit, over-worn, or misused contacts can cause inflammations, infections, and neovascularization of the eye which can potentially be vision threatening.

Would you consider it prudent for an amputee to go shopping for a prosthesis online without the consultation of his doctor? Or maybe a cardiac patient can look for good deals on heart valves while buying his new glasses? After all, they are both just pieces of plastic, right?

Trevor Linden, it's time to stop making a "spectacle" of yourself.